Water Harvesting Options for Farmers in 2021

Small farmers have always dealt with factors such as El Niño, droughts, frosts and climate change.  Rainwater harvesting systems allow farmers to have water year-round and to continue producing food.  If you are looking for a  Water Tanks Perth  supplier, this information may help. When you aren’t attached to mains water and the area you farm in isn’t known for high rainfall, having to capture your own water is one of the only options.  Water conservation structures like check dams, percolation tanks and farm ponds can play a key role in alleviate this issue, as well as turning around drought conditions.

large steel water tank for farmers

large zincalume water tanks for farmers with big farms

Farmers can identify natural canals for a dams run off and build there —using local materials such as stones and clay— a 3 to 4 meters wide dam crossed by several six-inch diameter pipes for drainage to prevent overflowing.

 

Rainwater harvesting is not just for residential buildings anymore. New and innovative techniques are being developed that allow farmers to collect rain from their roofs in order to conserve water, reduce irrigation costs and improve the quality of soil on their farms. Here’s how it works: a large storage tank or cistern is installed near the roof with gutters leading down towards it. When there is a storm, the collected water flows into the tank via gravity – no pumps required.  When the tank is full, excess water flows into an overflow drain that leads to a sump pump. This pump handles any surge in volume of rainwater runoff and then runs out into another storage area for ongoing use on the farm.

There are many benefits of harvesting rainwater: it reduces dependence on municipal sources; builds up buffer capacities during dry periods; provides natural fertilizer through irrigation with collected surface waters when necessary which decreases chemical input needs; improves soil composition by increasing organic matter content from decaying leaves, tree roots, animal droppings etc.; saves energy costs needed to move water around via pumps or pressurized pipelines. Another great benefit is helping local waterways stay clean! Rainfall run-off has been shown to carry pollutants like fertilizers and pesticides into rivers, streams and creeks.

This is done by redirecting the water that would have flowed out of a catchment area with gentle slopes or ridges to flow along contour lines instead. While harvesting rainwater for your farm can seem like an overwhelming task, it has many benefits as you saw in this blog post! I hope you found these reasons to be helpful for considering if rainwater farming is right for you.”

Rainfall run-off has been shown to carry pollutants like fertilizers and pesticides into rivers, streams and creeks. This is done by redirecting the water that would have flowed out of a catchment area with gentle slopes or ridges to flow along contour lines instead.

While harvesting rainwater for your farm can seem like an overwhelming task, it has many benefits as you saw in this blog post! I hope you found these reasons to be helpful for considering if rainwater farming is right for you.”

So why should farmers harvest their own water? Here are some of the top benefits:

– Harvesting and collecting one’s own rainfall means there is no need to drill deep wells which increases chance that well will dry up from depletion over time; – Rainwater collected on site provides free irrigation without contributing excess nutrients back into the soil (as fertilizers) or runoff offsite; – Harvesting rainwater also provides a free source of water for livestock to drink, making it more affordable for farmers; and

– The amount of surface area that is covered by the roof makes harvesting rainfall an ideal method since roofs are typically in close proximity.

So what should you do first? Here’s some tips:

– Determine catchment size needed based on your household needs and availability of space as well as slope or elevation change considering annual rainfall accumulation (i.e. how much rain will fall on this site?). Consider useable land areas such as hillsides with gentle slopes where runoff can be captured easily without damaging crops or pastureland below;

– Know what type of system would best suit your needs.

– Know that a well-designed rainwater harvesting system should not use any plumbing, pumps or other mechanical equipment to transport water. It should be gravity fed and self sustaining once it is established; and

– Begin building the framework for your catchment area. Consider capturing runoff from roofing eaves, downspouts, gutters and leader pipes so there are no losses in volume due to overflow onto soil where contamination could occur. Once you have constructed the frame of your catchment basin, make sure to create one large hole on each side at least five feet deep with sloping sides that will collect the surface flow into this structure as well as roofs (sloped towards ground) running across the top edges of all structures below which will catch runoff from the rooftops.

– Place a layer of coarse gravel on the ground below for good drainage and bottom slope to facilitate flow into basin; then place layers of filter fabric, followed by fine gravel or sand in order to provide filtration for water that will be collected before it is allowed to seep through your soil. Once this base has been laid out, you can begin planting vegetation at lower elevation levels while constructing terraces above so as not to disturb any viable plant life already growing there;

– Paint with compost tea every two weeks during summer months and continue adding charcoal mulch around trees (which also helps absorb excess carbon dioxide) when applicable. This should encourage robust growth which will anchor rainwater harvesting systems securely